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How to become an expert photographer

Both amateur and professional photographers are often changing to digital cameras because of its convenience, ease of use and efficiency, the ability to delete images you do not like photos and share with friends or store them on your computer. If you are an amateur, a novice or a professional photographer, there is some basic information you need to know about digital cameras.

1. Types of cameras

Digital cameras can be grouped into: a. Ultra Compact – small, no flash mode b. prosumer / compact – generally used by amateur c. Digital SLR – Equipped with tripod, lenses and external flash unit designed for professionals. If you look at photography as an art, it is advisable to go to the third category. The price varies in a multitude of factors, including resolution.

2. Number of mega pixels

Based on the number of mega pixels, the cameras can be classified into three categories: a. 3 mega pixels – can take snapshots of base but that's it, b. 3-5 megapixels – the photos will have a superior print quality, c. 5-7 Megapixels – can print in larger sizes.

3. Zoom

A camera generally has two types of zoom Features: Optical Zoom – magnifies the light entering through the main lens for the image seems to be closer, digital zoom – the greatness of the score. Optical zoom gives better quality.

4. Storage media

There are several types of storage formats, including: Compact Flash – for cameras compact digital SLR, b. Sony Memory Stick – compatible only with Sony devices, c. Smart Media storage – the storage size is above 64kb and can store 3 dozen mega pixel files, while 1GB can store approximately 500 images.

5. Carrying Case

The camera and its accessories should be made with a specific case to protect it from scratches, dirt or water.

6. Tripod

A tripod keeping the focus stable and is very useful when you set a timer.

7. Lenses and Filters

Some cameras allow additional targets to the lens principal while others all lenses are interchangeable. The lenses are classified into the following categories: a. macro lens – close-ups of small objects like flowers and insects; b. wide-angle lens – macro lens otherwise, is used to capture wide landscapes, c. telephoto lens – has a long zoom function lets take a picture from a distance when, for example, is dangerous to approach. Filters are used to soften the image, add flashes of light to increase the emotional impact blur the edges for portraits, reduce glare to make pictures more vivid and saturated.

Here are some strategies to help you get best results since the beginning:

1. Holding the Camera

In order to make a good picture, the camera should be considered as regularly possible. You must also ensure that your fingers do not interfere with the target. You have to do well after a little practice.

2. Focusing

Press the button so that only half block down until the point of view on the approach, then press it to fire. It is also better to use a tripod because it keeps the camera steadier.

3. Preview
Everyone knows that after taking a picture you can get a preview on the LCD of the camera. This gives you the opportunity to give him another chance if you did not like the result.

4. Filed

Create an album of all photos you've liked, so you can refer to them later. Having mastered the simple compact digital SLR camera can even take better pictures with other cameras.

About the Author

D. has been writing about image resizer software applications for reshade.com. The business is specialized in online image resizing and offers an
online photo resizing application
. Additionally it provides a
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application.

Open for Questions: Pete Souza


5 Comments

  1. Posted November 22, 2014 at 4:47 pm | Permalink

    Hello Russell!First and foremost, I’d like to azgpooile for the very late reply. Again, I’m terribly sorry!Two things you need to consider before getting a film camera:1) Which type of photography you would like to practice.2)What kind of film would suit you the most.You can then choose you camera accordingly.Plastic cameras are fairly cheap. You can get them at very reasonable prices on eBay. I would suggest Lomography.com, but their prices are a bit expensive compared to the rest. Anyways, I’d suggest you check with your local photo lab to see the types of film they develop. You wouldn’t want to get a medium format camera (cameras that use 120mm film) until you know for sure you can get your 120s process at your area. Getting them shipped and returned would cost a lot!I would suggest getting either a Diana or a Holga, if you are interesting in experimenting with photography. These two cameras will definitely help you find, and develop your own unique style as a photographer, and since they don’t cost an arm and a leg (like your average DSLR) you can modify your little plastic camera however you please!I’ve heard some very excellent stuff about the Lomo LC-A+. Great 35mm camera. Recommended for starters.There are plenty of other cameras which you can find, again, at lomography.comAll of the pictures above were taken from their online store.I’m really glad that you’re showing interest in film photography at a young age Film, in my opinion, requires more practice than digital photography. Granted your first couple of rolls might be either severely over exposed, or underexposed, but with practice, you might be the next HCB!I have tried, and loved Hipstamatic, but nothing beats the real deal ;p! Also, check Instagram. I’m sure you’ll love it! And if you create an account there, let me know. I’d love to see the pictures you take, Russell. I’m more active on Twitter, so if you want, you can reach me there. I’ll be able to answer your questions instantly. Hope I was somewhat of a help to you, and happy holidays!-Nada

  2. Posted February 23, 2015 at 3:57 am | Permalink

    There are wonderful caarmes to collect, many of them you wouldn’t easily be able to use. From daguerrorype caarmes to stereoscopic caarmes, big format ones. Those are really antiques. After, beautiful devices from Kodak, Rolleiflex, Exakta, Zeiss, Contax, all the slr, all medium format ones like the pretty Hasselblad and innumerable photography caarmes from everywhere. As a photographer, I prefer using them rather than collecting Was this answer helpful?

  3. Posted April 5, 2015 at 2:05 am | Permalink

    Hello Russell!First and foremost, I’d like to algoopize for the very late reply. Again, I’m terribly sorry!Two things you need to consider before getting a film camera:1) Which type of photography you would like to practice.2)What kind of film would suit you the most.You can then choose you camera accordingly.Plastic cameras are fairly cheap. You can get them at very reasonable prices on eBay. I would suggest Lomography.com, but their prices are a bit expensive compared to the rest. Anyways, I’d suggest you check with your local photo lab to see the types of film they develop. You wouldn’t want to get a medium format camera (cameras that use 120mm film) until you know for sure you can get your 120s process at your area. Getting them shipped and returned would cost a lot!I would suggest getting either a Diana or a Holga, if you are interesting in experimenting with photography. These two cameras will definitely help you find, and develop your own unique style as a photographer, and since they don’t cost an arm and a leg (like your average DSLR) you can modify your little plastic camera however you please!I’ve heard some very excellent stuff about the Lomo LC-A+. Great 35mm camera. Recommended for starters.There are plenty of other cameras which you can find, again, at lomography.comAll of the pictures above were taken from their online store.I’m really glad that you’re showing interest in film photography at a young age Film, in my opinion, requires more practice than digital photography. Granted your first couple of rolls might be either severely over exposed, or underexposed, but with practice, you might be the next HCB!I have tried, and loved Hipstamatic, but nothing beats the real deal ;p! Also, check Instagram. I’m sure you’ll love it! And if you create an account there, let me know. I’d love to see the pictures you take, Russell. I’m more active on Twitter, so if you want, you can reach me there. I’ll be able to answer your questions instantly. Hope I was somewhat of a help to you, and happy holidays!-Nada

  4. Posted May 30, 2015 at 11:43 pm | Permalink

    All of these articles have saved me a lot of headaches.

  5. Posted May 31, 2015 at 12:16 am | Permalink

    Good to see a talent at work. I can’t match that.

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